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enhancing and building more power grids. pakistan needs power. it needs access to energy. afghanistan needs power. if you create interdependency between these countries, especially countries that are not on friendly terms with each other, which will enhance the chances of stability to allot more more expensive projects could be pipelines and others, but at least the national grid, railroads. fortunately, pakistan is extending its railroad into kandahar. the railroad from central asia will connect now across afghanistan, north and south. we can really rebuild afghanistan as a crossroad or roundabout of trade. that is key. internally, improving access to capital in afghanistan by providing political incentives, in terms of political assurance, making more credit available for investment by international companies in afghanistan, allowing afghan companies to have access to easier credit -- these are the key issues that could help afghanistan on the economic front. more importantly, a clear message about the future of afghanistan that would give the investors and everyone else a sense of confid
: and for most of this hour conversation with the foreign minister of pakistan hina rabbani khar. >> i think pakistan today presents a country which is very clear notice head how it operate with its neighbors and that is to try and build on the trust and then build that trust enough to be able to build an environment in i we can take care of the disputes we have on the dialogue table rather than through military statements and through military actions. >> rose: the president's last press conference of his first term, and the foreign minister of pakistan when we continue. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following:. captioning sponsored by rose communications >> from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: tonight we begin with news from the white house, president obama held the last press conference of his first term this morning. most focus was on the battle over the nation's debt limit. the president warned in his opening are remarks that the failure to raise the debt sealing would threaten the u.s. economy. >> so we got to pay our bills. and republicans in
.s. and pakistan on that is better coordination between also there appears to be a better clarity of u.s. positions relating to the very important questions. >> i have offered a few comments that have made mr. my experience. i do not have any association with them. texas on liked several others have made policy at stakes. pakistan has suffered but it is not all on the ground or in on the floor of many of their contributions to the region. i would also say they cannot place the blame for all of the problems on to others. the first point of a to make here, this is done talk about credit bet. not as much now. i have not met for several years while i was i in the form office any responsible person from anti civilian leadership who would be seeking to go to afghanistan or who would be considering the taliban as an asset for the future. i am not going to go into details of these as far as the taliban as concerned. there is no question of popular returning to get in why i did enter the mid 1990's. there are reasons for this. there are to be details. i was the before the moment. there is one thing it. paki
applicable in pakistan. he had close relationships rhetorically with mullah omar and mullah omar reporter intervened on his behalf, again in 2006 to keep them in a leadership position in south waziristan. so does look like a pretty close operational relationship at least as far as it goes. for less than going to say just going forward is on the future of afghanistan, i could not agree more with what anand was thing about the money issue in afghanistan. i wrote a paper published here by new america called russian roulette, and i forget the subtitle, that runs through and as a comparison of the last days of the russian occupation in afghanistan in the late '80s with where we are today. frankly, i don't think from a sustainability of the afghan government standpoint we have done much better. and that's pretty depressing but i think that's the case. and we may have been worse. i think that a lot of ways you can make a strong argument that he was a more dynamic and creatively within hybrid car site. so the last thing though is where do we go going forward. and i think especially in the process
turkey and pakistan. so that constitutes the click of the taliban leadership in formally. second is the military side. people who may not be on the ground in afghanistan leading fighters but directing the insurgency on the day-to-day level. they either distressed u.s. intentions lower point* through the 2002 through 2004 period and many are people that did try to cut the deals and were rebuffed so know are on the military side. said talking to them as well there is a sense that they can reconstitute the '90s taliban. so if they hold on a little bit longer they can do that. but it is to understand the different position those with ordinary afghans with a focus on the troop number and talking whether there is 6,000 or 3,000 troops in afghanistan. that is important in the village where it is thought they would say they don't want any troops but in my discussion they don't think about it which is what we face today is a question of state formation. and in 2004. what i mean by that is and attempting to build the afghan state what happened was on the one hand they put money into kabul
afghanistan, and western pakistan. to get at them itself when the united states was puzzling over its resurgence in afghanistan as a military challenge that had been neglected in the years after the 2001 arab emirates that it presented itself as a grave dilemma to the obamacare administration so we try to provide the regularity about this phenomenon recognizing the cliche image of the of one i aid malaya and his band of fanatics was inaccurate and falsified the problem. said not to prosecute a particular view of the taliban but look at its diversity and aspects of the character fetter not part of american debate to. i am really proud of this book and peter whose leadership from new america has been a joy in my office to support him and watch him. the last thing i want to talk -- that i want to say is with the research is part of a much broader body of work that we engaged in it and hope your subscribers and readers as you are with foreign policy with conferences and publications, anyway we are pleased to have this occasion and have a discussion about the subjects that are in the book
are important for the role of pakistan and many others. with that, let me turn to our three speakers, each of whom will speak for summer between six and ten minute roughly speaking and then we will open up to questions or dialogue with respect to the audience. we will start with jim, if you are ready, give you the floor. >> my response ability for afghanistan goes back to 2001 and is fair to say the time was present for creation of the current regime and i start by looking back and try to spot the things we did wrong at the time and it strikes me there were three fundamental errors two of which i perceive that the time and tried to do something about and one of which i failed to proceed entirely and did nothing about. one was the decision not to deploy any american or international peacekeepers in the country. we have a country with no police force and no army and we decided security would be an afghan responsibility after the fall of the taliban. i think that was a major mistake. the second was to allow the coalition we successfully built for the war and the peace conference disintegrate.
pakistan, with respect to the important issues regarding the region. we called the event "back to the future." some people have spoken before about this, and what we mean by that. i think we will let that emerged as the discussion goes on. we know we have a lot of fundamental issues to talk about. certainly, military presence has been an issue talked about in the newspapers all lot. governance is an important issue. technical issues, such as what type of agreements might be signed between the u.s. and afghanistan, are important. the role of pakistan. many others. with that, let me turn to our three speakers, each of whom will speak for six to 10 minutes, roughly speaking. then we'll open it up to dialogue, with the audience. i will give you the floor. >> my responsibilities for afghanistan go back to 2001. it is fair to say i was present at the creation of at least the current regime in kabul. i started by looking back and trying to spot the things we did wrong. it strikes me that there were three fundamental errors, two of which are perceived at the time and tried to do someth
. a top taliban commander is killed in northwest pakistan. his violent movies are box office gold. we hear from quentin tar antino about his new film abnd nd signature style. welcome to our viewers on public television and around the globe. the five men accused of raping a university student for hours on a bus were charged and if convicted they may face the death penalty. the 23 year old woman died last week. it has sparked a debate in india. >> protests go on on the rape that has shocked india. lawyers set up to handle the case get their first trial. none are prepared to defend the five men charged with murdering and raping the student. >> it is heinous and in respect to the girl victim and as a message that we want to send to society, we want our society to be safe and such criminals will not get representation. >> no one is at home at the shack where the bus driver was living. the juvenile suspect al ledgedly caused the worst violence. the neighborhood under a cloud of shame. they say attitudes to women need to change. >> the problem sis with men, says this woman. and their bad intentio
to pakistan's foreign minister. according to one international ranking, pakistan ranks as the 34th most corrupt country in the world. it is not surprising that people are protesting. >> corruption that is a challenge in pakistan, like in many other countries. we are doing whatever we can and we intend to do more. we think that is very different than the type of person you are talking about, the person that has absolutely no credentials. staying for the last six years or more in canada. they are challenging pakistan and the fears of 180 million people. challenging the system or we have paid the price to put that in place in pakistan. >> you are talking about the clerics that have called on people to protest. but we talked to you about relations between washington and islamabad. one of the sticking points have been u.s. drone strikes within pakistan. there have been seven droned strikes within the past few weeks. have you come to the conclusion that these drones strikes are useful for pakistan? >> absolutely not. the point has been made for the last many years that they would be productiv
in northwest pakistan. his violent movies are box gold. we hear from quentin tar antino about his new film abnd nd signature style. welcome to our viewers on public television and around the globe. the five men accused of raping a university student for hours on a bus were charged and if convicted they may face the death penalty. the 23 year old woman died last week. it has sparked a debate in india. >> protests go on on the rape that has shocked india. lawyers set up to handle the case get their first trial. none are prepared to defend the five men charged with murdering and raping the student. >> it is heinous and in respect to the girl victim and as a message that we want to send to society, we want our society to be safe and such criminals will not get representation. >> no one is at home at the shack where the bus driver was living. the juvenile suspect al ledgedly caused the worst violence. the neighborhood under a cloud of shame. they say attitudes to women need to change. >> the problem sis with men, says this woman. and their bad intentions. after boarding the bus, the medical student
soldiers, which the military blamed on pakistan. he added that this should not derail stronger cross border ties. >> this is completely unacceptable. but at the same time, it's very important we make sure that whatever has happened may not -- should not be escalated. >> the indian military says a deadly gunfight with pakistani forces took place on tuesday. two indian soldiers were killed, one injured. it says the remains of the dead soldiers were mutilated. pakistan denies the negotiation. they have resumed comprehensive talks, which include the delicate subject of kashmir to try to improve bilateral relationship. another gunfight killed one pakistani soldier and injured another. observers say such incidents threaten to harm relations between the two nuclear neighbors. >>> politics in pakistan is heading for a potentially game-changing moment. former sporting hero turned politics enran kahn is wins legions of fans with his fierce stance against u.s. military policy and with parliamentary elections due by may, there is everything to play for. nhk world reports. >> reporter: imuran khan is ri
in pakistan. a man killed for allegedly desecrating the koran. foreign forces, rebels in the central african republic take yet another town. the venezuelan government says president chavez could begin another term even if he is too ill to be sworn in. despite what you see, these are fished out of water. they are living in the israeli desert. he was killed by a mob, allegedly for desecrating the koran. him was in police custody when angry villagers drag him from his cell, beat him to death, and set his body on fire. police in pakistan are still trying to find out who he was. we went to the province where it happened. warnings, there are images in this report, you may find disturbing. this man was taken from the police station in pakistan. he was murdered for allegedly desecrating the koran. >> police officials describe hundreds of villagers came to the police station. they took the man from behind these bars. they took him to the second floor, dropped his body, and set him on fire. >> seven police officials have been suspended since the killing last month. they were not able to protect a man
control of another. hello from doha. muslims in pakistan and calling on the army for protection after dozens are killed. the rebels in mali on the march doctor reports that the u.n. is calling for swift intervention. the somali in the millions on piracy calls for millions to give up their trade as he retires. opposition fighters in syria have taken control of a major military air base, the biggest in the country. the battle for taftanaz as been going on for two months. they're stealing weapons and taking over the runway right now. the fighters are also attacking another military base in the north. government troops are trying to secure the outskirts of aleppo. as the aftermath of attack in the town. there are also reports of heavy shelling by government plans. for more, i am joined from our reporter in beirut. how have they taken control and who has been leading the charge? >> in syria, it is the main force that has been able to give the regime a hard strike against a regime forces. they're the ones who led the attack and for two months, this has been a very strategic victory for the
in afghanistan or pakistan or africa 90% of ands come up and i think the as great tragedy we've lost that oral tradition and a rich tradition about folklore and heritage and faith and heritage. to honor that today i'd like to share with you a little story. it's a hard cover book that came out in march of 2006. anybody have a hard cover. wave it up here. you might not want it after i say this. i got to pick the title. three cups of tea but viking told me they would pick the subtitle and they picked one man mission to fight terrorism one school at a time. i objected because obviously there's- ways to fight tear riz m with education but i said i do this to promote peace and i started 8 years before 911 and this is about promoting peace through education. i've worked afghanistan and pakistan many years and i said we need to have a tribal council. i went to manhattan in the fall of 2005 and the big boss of the whole group, nancy shepherd and carlin coburn in publicity. we met in a little room and i stated my case and they said, this is your first book so you need to listen to a few things here. fir
. in november, pakistan released 18 of the taliban members by request. they are trying to transform the afghan taliban into a political force. a director from the atlantic council says releasing them may not help the pakistan any people in the long run. -- the pakistani people in the long run. >> there is a very real possibility of sanctuary, as well as militants that have been fighting with the taliban against the state of pakistan, so pakistan risks of not if the taliban comes back to power. that is something it certainly does not favor. it also does not favor that they have control of the border territory. >> now, the latest in our series, looking ahead to 2013. elections scheduled in may of next year in pakistan. it will be the first time the government has completed a full five-year term. and some issues are more basic. our reporter explains. >> the shelves are stocked, but there are few customers. one family has run this vegetables and fruit stand for over 25 years, but their business has been struggling in recent years. >> the customers are very worried. their monthly income is just not
afghanistan and pakistan. this is about an hour and a half. [inaudible conversations] >> well, good afternoon, everybody, and welcome. i'm steve coll, i'm the president of the new america foundation, and it's my pleasure to welcome you to this event briefly. and to introduce our subject which from our perspective involves the launch of a book that somebody will hold up for the audience since i don't have a copy. talibanistan. laugh -- [laughter] and i just wanted to say a few words about where this book came from and why the subject matter that you'll hear discussed today struck us as or worthy of what became really a couple of years of endeavor at new america led by peter bergen who will be your moderator through most of the program today. peter and katherine teedman, who unfortunately is not with us today, co-edited this book. it's a collection of scholarly and journalistic articles about the taliban and it environment in southern afghanistan and western pakistan. and it was born as an attempt at new america by a diverse group of researchers to try to get at some of the diversity of the tal
sentenced to the death penalty. >> thank you for being with us from new york. in pakistan, police have arrested five suspects in connection with the killing of health workers last month. the men were taken into custody in karachi. police seized hand grenades, guns, and bomb making materials. they say they confessed to killing two health workers. india has summoned pakistani envoy in new delhi to complain about an attack in which two indian soldiers died. accused pakistan of violating the cease-fire. >> the indian army paying tribute to the two soldiers killed on duty in kashmir. the territory is divided by what is called a line of control. india says pakistani soldiers took advantage of bad weather and low visibility to launch an attack on the indian side of that border. it has caused a diplomatic crisis and raised concerns over relations between the two countries. >> it is very important that we make sure that what ever happened should not be escalated. we cannot and must not allow the unfortunate events that have taken place. >> the pakistani ambassador to india was summoned to the i
will not be shown in pakistan. distributors there say they're worried about how the public will react. the oscar nominated "zero dark thirty" depicts a cia analyst tracking down the former a qaeda leader in pakistan. u.s. forces killed him in a hideout near islamabad in may 2011. a marketing manager at a movie distributor says many pakistanis sympathize with bin laden and are frustrated with the u.s. military operation in the country. >> there are sentiments of the public towards taliban or towards, you know, osama. and this -- we might hurt -- this film is hurting that. >> last september thousands of pakistanis protested against another u.s.-made film. they claimed insulted the prophet muhammad. more than 20 people died in clashes with police. pakistani authorities have since blocked access to the video-sharing website youtube. they've also banned sales of video games showing u.s. troops fighting terrorists in pakistan. >>> wildlife officials in malaysia are investigating the mysterious deaths of endangered elephants. the thai navy blocked them from landing on soil. it's the latest incident in
to resolve the fiscial clif. uni nazir was killed in pakistan -- he is one of the leaders accused of sending fighters into afghanistan but was seen as a friend in the pakistani state. for more on the use of drones, we have -- from the south asian council. how important a figure was this man? >> it is a huge, symbolic act. he has been replaced by someone else. the key message is the u.s. will follow and take out people crossing the border. if he was a friend to pakistan or if they were allowing him to operate because he wasn't attacking pakistan is a different matter. but his people along with similar groups were on the fringes, harboring elements that continue to attack the pakistani state. >> we have seen criticism of the u.s. drone policy -- would you expect more of that? a> in recent months there is heightened cooperation and visits from the head of inter- services and i believe they may well have understanding on the type of targeting that is permissable if the u.s. helps pakistan with the pakistani taliban, then perhaps the u.s. can get away with its own targeting list. >> this strike r
. she's expected to return in the next several weeks for another operation. >>> politics in pakistan is heading for a game changing moment. former sporting hero is winning fans with his fierce stance against u.s. military policy. >> reporter: the 60-year-old is in pakistan. across the country, tens and thousands wait to hear him speak. he once became famous on the field of pakistan's most popular sport, cricket. as captain of the national team in 1992, he thrilled the nation when pakistan won their first ever cricket world cup. khan later moved into politics, establishing his own political party, the pakistan movement for justice. his clean-cut image won popularity, especially among the underage groups. power in pakistan has traditionally swung back and forth between the two big parties but corruption has left the nation's politics in turmoil. voters are increasingly movement for justice is expected to make major gains in the upcoming election. >> they will be wiped out. they will be destroyed in the elections. they will lose so therefore there is a great desire for change. >> report
in pakistan. the top retailers have banned the sale of call of duty and the serioues medal of honor. they say it is portrayed pakistan as a failed state and has been unfairly linked to al qaeda. >> it opens with navy seals storming the docks of the port city. the mission is to destroy in black-market arms shipment. the plans go awry, sparking a chaotic car chase through the sprawling city amid warnings that pakistan's top intelligence agency is on its way. both games are first-person shooter games featuring realistic graphics. the players take on the persona of u.s. special forces agents and can play against other users to run the world. the games are not without controversy. both are extremely popular around the world, including in pakistan. retailers like this one have pulled the games of officials. top is because pakistan's electronic traders association ordered the board, of the gains after shopkeepers complained both unfairly depicted the country as a breeding ground for the excessive violence and where security forces of ties to al qaeda. >> they're basically anti- pakistan. the games a
to the to union, the former ambassador and the former secretary of pakistan to be hosted by the atlantic council here in washington, this is about 90 minutes. >> we are delighted to have you all. we are delighted to have our distinguished guests. it's pretty rare i think that you get three extraordinary ambassadors sitting next to one another each of whom has tremendous familiarity with the subject. on the council itself has been working on these issues for quite a number of years. this is actually the fourth anniversary of the salvation center. some of you may remember a few years ago the council did a very substantial report with respect to afghanistan. the then head of the council and the national security adviser was involved with some of the people in the audience involved frigate and we followed up on some of that work continuously over the last several years could get this is the latest installment if you will. i think that we all know that we are at an inflection point with respect to afghanistan to read a lot of the important decisions coming. president karzai is here to meet with presi
. there have been questions about the thrones strikes. pakistan will not be happy because it has expressed its willingness to try to reach a negotiated settlement. another -- pakistan has also been using its connections with leaders like the man who was killed and not carrying out attacks inside pakistan, but making no secret that they were waging war inside afghanistan. >> thanks very much from -- for joining us. five men in india are due to be charged for the murder and gang rape of a young woman. the case caused outrage across the country. the 23-year old student died in a hospital over the weekend. there is a demands for stricter laws for rape and crimes against women. what do you expect to be happening at the court today? >> the courts are going to close in about 20 minutes. the church sheets first went to the -- charge sheets first went to the high court to make sure everything was accurate. they will be e-mails into the courts. from there, it will be given to the cues so they can go through it. the document is about 1000 pages long. 900 pages are witness' testimony, including from the v
? or is there a difference? different kind of mission. those who are in pakistan, particularly the safe havens that are in pakistan, what kind of policy will you have. thank you. >> the mission will be fundamentally different. just to repeat. our main reason, should we have troops in afghanistan post 2014 at the invitation of the afghan government will be to make sure that we are training, assisting and afghan security forces who have now taken the lead for and are responsible for security throughout afghanistan. and of interest to the united states, the very reason we went to afghanistan in the first place to make sure that al qaeda and its affiliates cannot launch an attack against the united states or other countries from afghan soil. we believe that we can achieve that mission in a way that's very different from the very active presence that we've had in afghanistan over the last 11 years. president karzai has emphasized the strains that u.s. troop presences in afghan villages for example have created. well, that's not going to be a strain that exists if there is a follow-up operation, bec
. this is pakistan in 2005. 74,000 people were killed in this earthquake. 18,000 were kids going to school. most of the kids that died were younger and female because they didn't have desks so when the walls started shaking and the roof came down they perished. there was 9,000 schools destroyed or rendered unusable. 1/2 million kids displaced out of school. in earthquake, they call it the coy mot that means this apocalypse. at first there was a very heroic effort. infer natio international community helped. after katrina red cross got 2,000,000 for help and for this earthquake red cross received 6 million dollars. the united states sent in helicopters that conductd the greatest air lift in the history of mankind. moved about 20 thousand on thes in the mountains to keep 1/2 million people a hive during the wintertime. it was very heroic and people were grateful. aid has dropped 70 percent after a year in the wake of that void many jihad and people labeled terrorists have set up camps. this is one here. in pakistan. and in that camp, there are many kids that are previously were going to school and
in northern pakistan. tension over the indian flag continues in northern ireland as streets prepare for more protests. and as orthodox christians celebrate christmas, we speak to the egyptian pope. the international community has been quick to condemn syrian president bashar al assad's plan for peace in war-torn countries. the first speech called "beyond hypocritical." addressing supporters, described the opposition as terrorists and slaves of foreign power. he went on to support the national dialogue to end the 21-no conflict. assad these talks could create a national charter on syria's future, which he put to a referendum. while the opposition dismissed the proposals saying they're aimed at wrecking current diplomatic efforts. we frort amman's neighboring jordan. in an opera house in central damascus, packed with cheering supporters, the syrian president gave his first speech since june last year. he did not reveal any breakthrough to end the conflict but said every syrian had an ethical duty to fight rebels he linked with al qaeda. >> they are terrorists who follow al qaeda's philosophy.
used. seven charity workers have been killed in a drive-by shooting in northwest pakistan. police say that they were shot dead when their van was ambushed by gunmen on motorbikes. all of the victims are said to be pakistani citizens. our correspondent is there. what more details do we have? what do we know about these kinds of attacks? >> western pakistan has had a lot of attacks over the years. they have not been known for attacks like this, but the sense we are getting is that this happened just a couple of hours ago and, as you say, this community center was part school, part health clinic. all of the dead worked there, six of them were women. their vehicle was sprayed with bullets by gunmen riding motorbikes. six of the women have been killed, one man has been killed. the driver has been badly injured, we hear. >> these sorts of a tax must be putting off those who go and volunteer. >> these were shocking attacks. just a few weeks ago there were nine people involved in a polio vaccination program here in pakistan, many of them women as well, shot dead. of course, when it comes to w
years by the taliban. we succeeded against that. there are executions and -- pakistan is going through a very difficult time. and other of events there, they are all a source of concern for us. i can speak with satisfaction, the suffering that we have had, our schools are safer in the past three years, the great majority of girls go to school in afghanistan do if in safety and security. we have not had any major incidents. and this concern for families and students would be less and less a matter to think of. thank you, sir. >> this will conclude the program. i have one important announcement before i thank our remarkable speaker. please do not leave your seat until you hear the voice in the wilderness that will dismiss us. and only the afghan delegation will depart until such moment. on behalf of all of us, you have given us allot to think about. a lot of inspiration. women are lucky to have your support and we look forward to a wonderful future for your country. thank you so much. [applause] >> friday's news conference with president obama and president karzai. also, president karzai
soon to tell, but this could be a long war. >> pakistan is no stranger to political turmoil, and today they were reunited after the supreme court ordered the arrest of the prime minister on charges of corruption. from islamabad, we report. >> morning in islamabad. the day began with chaos near parliament. police firing in the air, saying they were shot at first by anti- government protesters. they say this is a peaceful revolution, that the government must go. this rally is just one challenge facing pakistan's leaders. this afternoon, there was another. protesters were euphoric when news broke that the prime minister was to be arrested. the celebration has really begun here. the crowd has just heard the news that the supreme court has ordered the arrest of pakistan's prime minister. people believe the timing shows that things are moving their way. they believe it is a victory for them. protesters say this is just the beginning of the change. >> the whole system will be changed. tos is the first step, remove the prime minister. >> here is the prime minister of arriving at the supreme co
>> the supreme court of pakistan borders the rest of the prime minister over longstanding corruption allegations. thousands of protesters rallied in islamabad against what they say is a crooked government. hello. this is al jazeera live from doha. african military leaders are meeting to speed up the deployment of a new international force in mali. >> on the first humanitarian flights into rebel-held territory in the central african republic. i will be reporting on the desperate need for the people. >> and the last sighting of a missing activist. why the police have come under suspicion. a pakistan's supreme court has issued an arrest warrant for the prime minister. raja pervez ashraf is accused of corruption in deals to build new power plants when he was a water and power minister. the court has given 24 hours to arrest him along with 16 other people to. this decision comes as tens of thousands of protesters rallied against corruption of the leader.n >> we are here in front of the parliamentary house just to save our country from collapse and from complete ruin. we need su
>> more than 100 people killed across pakistan in a string of shootings and bombings. good to have you with us. this is al jazeera in so hot. execution-style killings in the heart of paris this is al jazeera in doha. harding in for a president who has not been seen in weeks. thousandth -- partying for a president who has not been seen in weeks. pro-shaba's demonstrations. -- pro-chavez demonstrations. more than 100 people died in pakistan in a day of violence. in the capital of pakistan's province, more than 19 people killed in an explosion. of least 25 people died in the valley with a bomb exploded. these people gathered to see our religious leaders the. in karachi, nine people were shot dead in seven incidents. >> just a few of many of the victims and distraught relatives after one of the deadliest attacks in years. two bombs went off, starting a snooker club. police say the first explosion was set off by a suicide bomber. people rushed to the scene to help but were hit by a second blast. security officers, a journalist, and rescue workers were killed. >> as we got to the scene,
raising letters and in pakistan i learned to use a local laptop. slate board there. the whole village participated in the building school and it was a joy ous time. this is 18 miles - on that bridge - i didn't mention it but there's 5, 800 pound cables they carried up to the village. 8 men would put this with a spool and carry this up to the village. this is where they're carrying the struts and beams for the roof. what's amazing here, this man is the head man for the village. i don't know if there's clergy here, but in their culture they're not supposed to do labor. they're suppose to give spiritual advice. he carried the first load symbolizing his advocacy for education. in the back there's the silver beard. see after three years we hadn't gotten very far. the problem wasn't them but me. i was doing something we call micromanage meant. i had my receipts and i was determined to make this school getting built without losing one dollar and village chief one day came up to me and sat me down and said son, you need to do one thing, you need to sit down and be quiet and let us do the wor
under indian law. reports from northwest pakistan say that a militant commander has been killed in a u.s. drawn strike. pakistani officials told the bbc that mullah nazir and at least five others were killed in the attack in south waziristan near the afghan border. we have our islamabad correspondent, aleem maqbool. >> he is one of the key figures within the taliban in northwest pakistan. he is a man who controls a large part of south waziristan, which is a taliban stronghold, particularly the area of wana and towards the afghan border. certainly, the americans will be very pleased that he is now gone. the problem in afghanistan is not -- is that they are not just fighting the taliban there, but the militants often escape across the border into pakistan. mullah nazir was somebody who not only provided safe haven within the south of waziristan, but also provided fighters and material support for the insurgency across the border in afghanistan. >> these drone attacks have been controversial, haven't they? how will the pakistan government be dealing with the u.s. strong strike -- the fact
are entering their fourth day. training camps and logistic depots were bombed. in pakistan the government is removing staff for failing to provide security after 96 people were killed in twin bombings on thursday. most of the victims shia muslims. in pakistan a cleric has begun what he calls a strong -- long march from the city of lahore to the capital of is not bad. he once sweeping electoral reforms, but critics say he does want to upset elections later this year. >> he is only 12 years old, but that is old enough to be immersed in politics in pakistan. >> the government is wrong. they have made our life helle. >> some have thrown their support behind a canadian- pakistani crcleric. his message resonates with people fed up with the breakdown of law and order and an increase of corruption and inflation. many are so angry that even mothers with no relation to the clerics s say they are ready to sacrifice their children. >> i told my children not to be afraid of bullets. take the bullet in your chest. we want change and revolution. our society will not move forward until we become selfless
steve as well about your deep knowledge of afghanistan and pakistan and the other bordering states. >> this is one that has taken a back burner. we are not that far removed from the election. the election was about by and large nothing more than the economy and which side could do it better. as a result almost every other issue gets pushed to the side, but we have, you know -- there are realtime tables in place in afghanistan about what we have pledged to do, what we will do. you talk about chuck hagel. what chuck hagel's role in all of that, if et wants to be secretary of defense. it's a complicated issue, and it's more complicated politically, andrea, simply because the american public -- this happened in iraq. it's clearly happening in afghanistan. the american public has tired of our involvement in these conflicts. this is not something new. this is something that has been long and coming. if you look at the history in polling at least of when that happens, public opinion almost never sort of sways back up to all of a sudden be supportive and think this was a battle worth fight
. affiliated movements have taken us beyond the core leadership in afghanistan and pakistan, including the middle east, and east africa, central asia, and southeast asia. although each group is unique, all aspire to advance al qaeda's agenda by stabilizing the companies in which they operate and attacking the u.s. and plotting to strike it u.s. homeland. in south asia, al qaeda continues to pose a threat from its base of operation in pakistan's tribal areas. in order to use that to carry a attacks against a homeland as well as our interests and those of our allies and partners in pakistan, afghanistan, india, and europe. the united states faces to counter terrorism charges -- a direct threat posed by al qaeda in the arabian peninsula and the individuals and charities that flow from the region to al qaeda and its affiliates from world. on this point particularly, i want to emphasize severing the pipeline is a major part of what we're doing in its administration. al qaeda has shifted its activities to the relative safe haven of northern mali where it is training fighters and other allied
's talk about pakistan. [laughter] >> that is a law professor thinking that is easier. go ahead. >> a number of our questioners note that it seems to be public record that there have been some challenges in the relationship between our government and pakistan and, yet, pakistan continues to be an important strategic partner, and allied in a very complicated region. i would love to hear you speak a little bit about how you see that relationship with respect to our law enforcement activities and what you think we might expect in that relationship going forward. >> it is interesting. in today's world of globalization -- when i started as a united states attorney back in the late 1970's, i probably had one case that had some ramifications outside of this district. now, i would say it is probably the reverse. nine out of 10 cases intersect with persons in other jurisdictions, whether it be within the united states or internationally. what happens is, regardless of whether it is pakistan or a number of countries you could mention where we have diverging interests, there are also inter
, thank you. >> brown: still to come on the "newshour": bombings in pakistan claim more than 100 lives; the new ability to pay mortgage lending rules; political uncertainty in venezuela and hollywood's take on the hunt for osama bin laden. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: vice president biden will send his recommendations to curb gun violence to president obama by tuesday. the vice president held another round of meetings on the topic in washington today. this time, including sporting groups as well as the powerful national rifle association and others. mr. biden said a consensus is emerging for tightening background checks and banning high-capacity ammunition magazines. >> there's got to be some common ground here to not solve every problem but diminish the probability that what we've seen in these mass shootings will occur and diminish the probability that our children are at risk in their schools. >> sreenivasan: late today, the n.r.a. issued a statement saying it was disappointed that the discussions focused mainly on what it called an
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